The Health Edge: Diet and Weight Loss Myths

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Tape measure squeezing scales to form waist

In this episode of the Health Edge Mark challenges some common myths as they relate to diet, weight loss and improved metabolism. Is with loss more than a calories in – calories out accounting proposition? Does fat really make you fat because it has more calories per gram?

Dietary carbohydrate restriction as the first approach in diabetes management. A critical review of the evidence

How calorie -focused thinking about obesity and related diseases may mislead and harm public health. An alternative.

Comparison with ancestral diets suggests dense acellular carbohydrates promote an inflammatory microbiota, and may be the primary dietary cause of leptin resistance and obesity.

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4 thoughts on “The Health Edge: Diet and Weight Loss Myths

  1. Allissa Harter

    Mark Pettus – thank you very much for putting much needed new science in front of many listeners. This podcast is comphrensive and necessary to be forwarded to the medical profession and into the American narrative of diet. It is important and insightful. Thank you for doing this. It is an amazing podcast. I am forwarding it to friends in an email and on my FaceBook page. Excellent work!

    My deepest positive hopes for your colleague Dr. Bagnulo and his family.

  2. Sam May

    I hope you will consider doing a podcast on the new “guidelines” for statins. It’s all over the news. I threw my statins away five years ago, but I could use some help with talking points. Thanks.

    • Great suggestion Sam! I’ll soon review these updates (USPTF just updated their recommendations) and what, I believe, the implications are. As they say, coming soon…
      Happy Holidays!
      Mark

  3. Marianne

    My husband was on statins for 15 years for no particular reason other than that his prescribing doctor thought everyone should take them, then stopped dosing about 1 1/2 years ago. At his annual physical a couple of days ago, his doctor commented that his current lab results are the best of any of her male patients — very high HDL, very low triglycerides, LDL that is “right on.” Then she punched numbers into her device and said, “We recommend that you take statins.” The bottom line is that, the way the inputs (gender, age, and race) are weighted in the formula they use, the standard of care mandates that every white male over age 63 should be on statins even if all the other inputs are optimal. It takes a lot of resolve for the patient to say “No!

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